Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Russell Tice
Whistleblower and former NSA analyst
MSNBCW 06/21/2013
Tice: NSA today is collecting everything, including content, of every digital communication in this country, both computer and phone. And that information is being stored indefinitely. And that's something they are lying about. And that facility out there in Utah is online right now. Melvin: And the fact that they have said they do not do that, you're saying that's just a flat out lie. Tice: That's correct.
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
CNNW 06/23/2013
Part 1 Glenn Greenwald: The real issue that we ought to focus on is what is it that Mr. Snowden has revealed about the government that makes them want to put him into prison so eagerly. You said earlier that there were other ways to do this. Ron Wyden and Mark Udall have been running around the country for three years now saying that the Obama administration is using secret law to engage in domestic spying that in their words would stun the American people if they learned about it and yet they were prevented even members of the senate intelligence committee were prevented from telling uses as Americans what it is
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
CNNW 06/23/2013
Part 2 Glenn Greenwald: that they were so alarmed about. So I'd like anybody who says there are other ways to bring transparency, are other ways to expose this to tell me or anybody what those other ways there are. The problem is that these things were suppressed and concealed until he stepped forward and exposed it. And that seems to be a much more important question than what country he's choosing to go to.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 06/23/2013
(Congress could) get the full story in a classified setting but that does not exclude the practice of half truths and misleading statements being made public record. When did it become all right for government officials' public statements and private statements to differ so fundamentally? The answer is that it is not all right, and it is indicative of a much larger culture of misinformation that goes beyond the Congressional hearing room and into the public conversation writ large.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 06/23/2013
For example, last year the Director of National Security Agency spoke over at the American Enterprise Institute when he said publically, “We don’t hold data on US citizens.” That statement sounds reassuring. But, of course, the American people now know it is false. In Fact, it is one of the most false statements ever made about domestic surveillance.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
KPIX 06/23/2013
Schieffer: do you believe Senator Feinstein-- we know and we have learned a lot about the capabilities of the US government. Do you-- have you at this point come to any conclusion about whether those capabilities and that power was abused by these agencies? Feinstein: No, I have seen no abuse by these agencies, nor has any claim ever been made in any way shape, or form, that this was abused.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
KPIX 06/23/2013
I happen to believe that this program (Sec. 215 telephone “bulk surveillance”) is carefully watched by the Justice Department, by independent inspectors general, by the NSA. Only 22 people at NSA have access to it. In the year 2012, it was only queried 300 times.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
KPIX 06/23/2013
In the year 2012, it (Sec. 215 telephone “bulk surveillance”) was only queried 300 times. If they need a warrant to get content, that's sent to the FBI and the FBI gets a court warrant before any content of any conversation is looked at.
Mike Rogers
U.S.Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 06/23/2013
Rogers: They should use every legal avenue we have to bring him back to the united states. And listen, if he believes that he's doing something good -- by the way, he went outside all of the whistleblower avenues available to anyone in this government, including people who have classified information. We get two or three visits from whistleblowers every single week in the committee. And we investigate every one thoroughly. He didn't choose that route. If he really believes he did something good, he should come back and face the consequences of his actions.
Loretta Sanchez
Representative, Member of Committee on Homeland Security Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security - Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence
MSNBCW 06/23/2013
Loretta Sanchez: Err on the Sense of national security. It's the Congress, actually, who can rein it in, but it's the Congress that's allowed it to be much broader and allow collection to happen. My biggest point is not everybody in the Congress is given access to what is really happening. And so when our American public says, hey, we don't know about this, and why are you doing this,
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